Founders Day 2016 – Save The Date

Black Knights,

WPSWPS celebrates Founders Day this year with a visit from Superintendent Caslen at Hotel Murano in Tacoma, WA.

Update: The Invitation and RSVP form are here.  Please print and mail to the WPSWPS Treasurer as indicated on the RSVP form.

The date is Friday 26 February 2016.  Reception with the Supe for Class of 2020 (!) Candidates is at 1730-1800.  Benny Havens Hour is 1800-1900.  The Banquet begins at 1900.

Invitations go out by email on 05 January 2016.  To make sure you receive one, login and update your information at WPAOG now.

Update: The Invitation and RSVP form are here.  Please print and mail to the WPSWPS Treasurer as indicated on the RSVP form.

WPSWPS Summer 2014 Picnic

A fine, fun and improving event it was.  Weather was perfect, water blue at American Lake.  Mark and Cora Lijek spoke to us about their escape from Iran after the curtain fell in 1979.  Four West Point parent couples attended, accounting for six graduates between them.

Kent Troy, ’81, took these pictures, click for full version:

Our President, Jim Schoonover, '64, Welcomes The Gathering And introduces The Speakers

Our President, Jim Schoonover, ’64, Welcomes The Gathering And introduces The Speakers

The Gathering Of Young, Active and Retired Graduates and Parents Of Graduates

The Gathering Of Young, Active and Retired Graduates and Parents Of Graduates

The Gathering, Looking Towards The Late Afternoon Sun

The Gathering, Looking Towards The Late Afternoon Sun

Mark And Cora Lijek Are Retired Foreign Service Officers

Mark And Cora Lijek Are Retired Foreign Service Officers

President Schoonover Presents The Lijeks With A Photobook About West Point

President Schoonover Presents The Lijeks With A Photobook About West Point

The Fort Apache Historic District

From Dempsey Darrow, ’75, Former CEO of WP-ORG:

The Fort Apache Historic District is located just a few miles south of Whiteriver, Arizona, on the 1.67 million acre White Mountain Apache Indian Reservation. It was a major base of operations for the US Army during the Apache Wars of the 19th century. Decommissioned in 1922, it remains the site of the Theodore Roosevelt Indian School. It is part of the legacy of the Old West, the Indian Wars, and therefore, of West Point graduates.

Below are links to some visual representations of the fort. At the bottom is a link to the entire album with additional photographs, including some of the Kinishba Ruins.

The top link for all these photos and more is here.

George Crook is part of the fabric of the Indian conflict on the Great Plains and in the southwest. These were his quarters at Ft. Apache:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hf1154d4#hb3fda68
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hf1154d4#hf1154d4

The Adjutant’s office:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hf1154d4#he0fece1
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hf1154d4#h1a5d66d4

The enlisted barracks:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#hcd2f25a
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#h111d9993

The old guard house:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#ha9c7521
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#h6ab5f32

The view across the parade field toward the Theodore Roosevelt School’s boys dormitory and the Adjutant’s office:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#h993d1c8

The school:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h764dcb
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h74c8808

The new guard house:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#hc2c327b
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/he0fece1#h1593e312

Just a few miles from the site of the fort is the still active Fort Apache cemetery, though most non-Apaches were reinterred elsewhere when the fort was decommissioned. Getting to the cemetery was interesting; it had rained just prior to our arrival. There’s nothing like the rush of adrenaline that accompanies the loss of effective steering while piloting a two-ton, four wheel drive vehicle through mud.

http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#hf364f5e

The identities of many of the individuals who remain buried in the cemetery are now lost to time:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#hb4e6973

Navajo Bill was one of the Apaches who worked for George Crook:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h70c54de

There are reminders of the unique quality of Army life on the frontier:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h732c0b9

Corydon Cooley was a Chief of Scouts for George Crook. He once pulled an all-nighter playing cards (Seven Up) where the stake was a 100,00 acre ranch. Cooley’s opponent told him, “Show low and you take the ranch.” Cooley turned over a winning deuce of clubs. That’s how the ranch – now the town of Show Low, Arizona – got its name. The town’s main street is called Deuce of Clubs.
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h1b0d83c7

Not far from Fort Apache are the Kinishba Ruins:
http://outrider.darrows.org/fortapache/hc2c327b#h35b82670

The top link for all these photos and more is here.

Fort McDowell Cemetery

Dempsey Darrow, ’75, offers this West Point-related historical edification:

Mary and I drove over to the Ft. McDowell Cemetery today; it’s only ten minutes from the house. It’s now under the purview of the Yavapai Nation.

As a lot of you know, when George Crook addressed the “Indian Question” in Arizona Territory he used friendly Apaches as “scouts” to follow the trails of the hostiles. Some of these men are buried there. Also interred there is Carlos Montezuma, a remarkable Apache who was born in the area and went on to become a doctor.

Then there are the Indians who died in Skeleton Cave. Their remains are in the cemetery in a mass grave. If you’re not familiar with this fight on the bank of the Salt River you probably should be because as West Point graduates it’s part of our legacy.

I’ve provided a couple of pertinent links. Here is a little of what we saw.